Barcelona Container Port Photo: Davies / CC-BY-SA

The Port of Barcelona is a participating incentive provider in the World Ports Climate Initiative's Environmental Ship Index.

Mitigation and moving towards low carbon waterborne transport infrastructure

All sectors must play their part in climate change mitigation. The waterborne transport infrastructure sector is no exception.

Port and waterway infrastructure and operations typically account for only a very small proportion of the total greenhouse gas emissions associated with the shipment of a particular consignment. The most significant proportion by far is associated with the sea voyage, and a varying amount with connecting transport.

It is nonetheless important that the owners, operators and users of waterborne transport infrastructure take steps to minimise the emissions associated with their activities if they are to contribute to the ‘less-than-2-degrees’ pathway.

The associations represented on the the Navigating a Changing Climate Partnership recognise the importance – and the urgency – of implementing effective mitigation measures and of moving towards low carbon infrastructure.

Coalition members further acknowledge the need for innovation alongside conventional emissions-reduction measures: for example initiatives aimed at improving integration to increase energy efficiency or at creating carbon sinks in coastal areas by Working with Nature.

As with other sectors, such innovation has the potential to bring associated social, employment and economic opportunities.

Wednesday, 27 January 2021 13:00

Sediment management and climate change - registration open for joint NavClimate-SedNet workshop

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Sediment management opportunities to address the climate change challenge

Registration is open for the joint NavClimate-SedNet virtual workshop on 'Sediment management opportunities to address the climate change challenge'.

The workshop will comprise two consecutive half-day sessions.  Its aim is to facilitate knowledge exchange, disseminate good practice, highlight opportunities, and identify gaps in understanding or research needs in relation to the four topics mentioned below, with an emphasis on ports, waterways, dredging and associated infrastructure/ activities.

It promises to be an inspiring workshop for sediment practitioners (policy and management) as well as scientists. Invited key-note speakers and selected abstracts will address in the following (non-parallel) sessions – with room for Q&A – these four topics:

- Role of sediment management in carbon sequestration and storage: opportunities to contribute to a net reduction in greenhouse gas emissions

- Sediments and climate change adaptation: seeking flexible and adaptive solutions to strengthen resilience and adapt port and navigation infrastructure and operations

- Habitat enhancement and creation, Working-with-Nature and other nature-based solutions

- Sediment management, circular economy and the waste hierarchy: reduce, reuse, recycle.

The four workshop sessions conclude with a panel discussion and an interactive session with the audience to determine:

– Key climate change-related challenges for sediment managers;

– Key opportunities for sediment management to contribute to addressing the climate change challenge;

– Key topics for further research and development.

For more details or to register for participation please email the SedNet Secretariat  before 6 February.

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